Diabetes and Disparities


 
For many populations, the risks of being diagnosed with diabetes are high. Some sub-groups in the U.S. are less likely to have access to treatment to help manage their diabetes. Data from the  2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet show that compared to non-Hispanic white adults, the risk of being diagnosed with diabetes was 18 percent higher among Asian Americans, 66 percent higher among Hispanics, and 77 percent higher among non-Hispanic blacks. 
 
 

 
The federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) released the 2007 National Healthcare Disparities Report. The report provides an overview of healthcare disparities among different sub-groups in the general U.S. population.
 
Diabetes Disparities According to the 2007 National Healthcare Disparities Report:
 
► From 2002 to 2004, there were no significant changes for blacks and whites in the proportion of adults age 40 and over with diabetes who also received three recommended services such as: HbA1c testing; eye examination; foot examination in the past year; influenza immunization; and lipid management.
 
► The gap between Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites age 40 and over with diabetes and received at least three of the recommended services remained the same. In 2004, this was significantly lower for Hispanics than for non-Hispanic Whites (38.8 percent compared with 49.2 percent).
 
► In 2004, adults age 40 and over with diabetes who received three recommended services was lower for people with less than a high school education and high school graduates than for people with at least some college (35.2 percent and 45.7 percent compared with 55.9 percent).
 

  
Sample Diabetes Projects Addressing Disparities