Alzheimer's Disease

Moderator:
Massachusetts State Representative Danielle Gregoire
Featuring:
Catherine Freiman, Medical Director – Alzheimer’s, Biogen
Jennifer Rosen, Director of State Affairs, Alzheimer’s Association
Minnesota State Senator Carla J. Nelson
 
Disease Statistics - 2021 (check out Alzheimer's Association Facts and Figures)
 
Prevalence, Incidence and Mortality
  • An estimated 6.2 million Americans age 65 and older are living with Alzheimer’s dementia in 2021.
  • More than 1 in 9 people (11.3%) age 65 and older has Alzheimer's dementia.
  • Two-thirds of Americans over age 65 with Alzheimer’s dementia (3.8 million) are women
  • Death due to Alzheimer’s between 2000 and 2019 has more than doubled, increasing 145%.
  • 1 in 3 seniors dies with Alzheimer's or another dementia.
Caregiving
  • In 2020 more than 11 million caregivers of people with Alzheimer's or other dementias provided an estimated 15.3 bllion hours of unpaid care, a contribution to the nation valued at $267 billion.
  • Nearly half of all employers (48%) who provide help to older adults do so for someone with Alzheimer's or another dementia.
  • Approximately two-thirds of caregivers are women, and one-third of dimentia caregivers are daughters.
  • Forty-one percent of caregivers have a household income of $50,000 or less.
Cost of Care
  • In 2021, total payments for all individuals with Alzheimer's or other dementias are estimated at $355 billion (not including unpaid caregiving).
  • Medicare and Medicaid are expected to cover $239 billion or 67% of the total health care and long-term payments for people with Alzheimer's or other dementias. Out-of-pocket spending is expected to be $76 billion.
  • Total payments for health care, long-term care and hospice care for people with Alzheimer's and other dementias are projected to increase to more than $1.1 trillion in 2050.
  • The total lifetime cost of care for someone with dementia is estimated at $373,527.

Race, Ethnicity, and Discrimination

  • Two-thirds of Black Americans (66%) believe it is harder for them to get excellent care for Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias. Likewise, 2 in 5 Native Americans (40%) and Hispanic Americans (39%) believe their own race or ethnicity makes it harder to get care, as do one-third of Asian Americans (34%).
  • Nearly two-thirds of Black Americans (62%) believe that medical research is biased against people of color — a view shared by substantial numbers of Asian Americans (45%), Native Americans (40%) and Hispanic Americans (36%) as well. Only half of Black Americans (53%) trust a future cure for Alzheimer’s will be shared equally regardless of race, color or ethnicity.

  • Fewer than half of Black (48%) and Native Americans (47%) feel confident they have access to providers who understand their ethnic or racial background and experiences, and only about 3 in 5 Asian Americans (63%) and Hispanics (59%) likewise feel confident.

  • Half of Black Americans (50%) report they’ve experienced discrimination when seeking health care; more than 4 in 10 Native Americans (42%) and one-third of Asian Americans (34%) and Hispanic Americans (33%) likewise report having experienced health care discrimination.

Check out the FDA's New Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease

 
Get Involved - Alzheimer's Awareness

Sample Legislation

  • Georgia SB 14: Creates the Georgia Alzheimer's and Related Dementias State Plan Task Force

Additional Resources